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, they renounce violence, use security forces to go after the militants and he's gone so far in recent interviews to admit the palestinians would concede their right to return to the land they or their families held before 1948 inside what is now israel. in return for this, he has seen basically nothing. except for the continued settlement. when they took over the p.a., there were 250,000 settlers in the west bank. today, there are 350,000. assume, for the sake of argument, for a moment, hamas targets israeli civilians because of a cult of death, but a tactic to achieve certain things. this idea that terrorism is adopted by certain groups was articulated by a young state senator at a book event in 2004. >> ultimately, terrorism is a tactic. it's not -- we're not fighting terrorists, we are fighting people who engage in terrorism. but, have a whole host of rationals and excuses for why they do this and to the extent we can change this sense of opportunity in these countries and we can change the manner in which we function in these countries and more positive, proactive ways, then we are not going
. now as head of the palestinian authority, mahmoud abbas has renounced violence, even used security forces to go after militants. he accepts and are recognizes israel and its right to exist. he's gone so far in recent interviews to admit that palestinian was concede their right to return to the land they or their families held before 1948 inside what is now israel in return for this, he has seen basically nothing. except for the continued settlement growth. when aboss took over p.a., there are 350,000 settlers in the west bank. assume that hamas targets israeli civilians not solely because of some cult of death, but that it adopts this as a tactic to achieve certain aims. the idea that terrorism is a tactic adopted by certain groups at times was articulated by a young state senator back at a book event in 2004. >> ultimately terrorism is a tactic. it's not, we're not fighting terrorists, we're fighting people who engage in terrorism. but have a whole host of rationales, and excuses for why they do this. and to the extent that we can change the sense of opportunity in many of these c
, not that person. we are going to contact them over and over again until we get them out to vote. using data was migrated into the obama campaign. we are going to be in a video game. we are in your video game and there's an obama ad. we are going find where you live like coca-cola targets you. it's survived tharks model. >> it's very important. obama seems to have mastered this whole thing. the microtargeting, the sophisticated analysis, there's a little thing called the voters and things called issues and how you get voters energized in your candidacy and in your platform. i think we lose a great deal of that in when we start talking so much about what is it going to take -- >> wait. defend that. defend that. >> i'll second the motion. >> i'm going to argue both of you. >> i'll second the motion. it's become a science, this microtargeting of voters. you lose sight of the people, lose sight of the issues on the ground. however, if you have field offices in all the communities, counties in ohio, you are trying to engage people on the ground. it's better than the air war, which republicans rel
phenomenal work. tuesday's election brought us not just a second term for president obama but a new congress as well. there are two ways to look at the make up of the congress. one is the endorsement of the status quo. asking the two to work together as house speaker john boehner put it the day after the election. >> the american people have spoken. they reelected president obama. they have again reelected a republican majority in the house of representatives. if there's a mandate in yesterday's results, it's a mandate for us to find a way to work together on the solutions to the challenges we all face as a nation. >> the other way to interpret the results is to see them as a resounding liberal governance. a larger and apparently more democratic majority in the senate. it's how harry reid framed the results. >> we had an overwhelming re-election of the president. we picked up seats in the senate and the house. it's not the status quo. >> one thing is clear. it will not look like any congress we have ever had. the most stunning exacten is the diminishing number of white men in house of repres
conspired to reduce our privacy. first, there's technology. social media allowed us to share every detail of our lives intentionally and unintensely. the photo tagged on facebook, the wayward strike to reply to all button. you get the picture. we now leave a digital trail traced by anyone who buys access to it. this week, the obama campaign knew what tv shows the targeted voters watched. there's the massive explosion of the surveillance in the wake of 9/11. thanks to the petri at act and continued under the obama administration. the government has more access to info about us than at anytime in history. a small example of what this looks like. check out this graph of u.s. government from google. these are requests that don't require warrants and this doesn't include the security related requests not disclosed. for awhile, i thought the combination of these trends, the u bik wiity of technology was pushing us to a future where citizens would be unable to keep their secrets while the government keeps its secrets. i feared it would end up totally exposed to each other and the state. the stat
panel to investigate the attacks on the u.s. consulate in benghazi in september. we will be talking about both those stories in-depth on tomorrow's show. but right now i am joined by george gale, executive director of nation people's actions, which advocates for racial and economic justice, heather mcgee, vice president of the progressive think tank, new york democratic congressman and friend of the show jerry mather and msnbc contributor joy reed, managing editor of thegrio.com. on a conference call with donors this week, portions of which were posted online by abc news mitt romney blamed his loss to president obama on what he calls gifts the president had given to core democratic constituencies like students, women, and latinos. >> what the president -- the president's campaign did was focus on certain members of his base coalition, give them extraordinary financial gifts from the government, and then work very aggressively to turn them out to vote. >> just note that, you know, doesn't actually cost any money but side point. romney's framing of the president's campaign strategy is
it was a 1,000-mile wide storm. at least 109 people are said to have died in the u.s. and another 60 were killed in the caribbean. as of this morning 2.9 million customers remain without power across 15 states and the washington, d.c. the economic losses are nearing $50 billion. flooding of new york subways and commuter train tunnels and loss of business accounts for much of that estimate. with an election just a few days away the political media industrial complex briefly ground to a halt and then somewhat awkwardly cranked back to life with mitt romney turning a campaign event into a relief rally. president obama heading back out on the trail and pundits growing more and more comfortable speculating consequences of the disaster. local and area officials had to make practical decisions and give emergency briefings and address the anxiety of their constituents. governor chris christie seemed to suggest he wasn't taking the election into consideration. >> is there any possibility that governor romney may go to new jersey to tour some of the damage with you? >> i have no idea. nor am i the
knocking on doors and we were asking people to remember us on the day that they were going out to vote. and so while it was very frustrating to not -- you know, to be politically engaged in this, in my country, and not be able to go out and express who i want to run this country and to lead us, i think we had a tremendous amount of impact. >> that brings up our next big topic. this is one of the things that i think dominated the discussion after the election, which is the changing demographics of america, the changing faces of america and the respective coalitions that have come together around barack obama and the republican party particularly. i want to talk about why it's not the latino vote that tells us the most about the republican party's future. my story of the week right after this. nning four. fortunately we've got ink. nning four. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chas
us last week, he's back today to give us an update. tell me how yesterday went. >> yesterday went really, really well. in my store, which is in the los angeles area, we ended our protests with over 1,000 people. it started off small and, of course, as workers in the stores that were around us who weren't originally a part of it saw how big it got. they came out and joined us. and we ended up with about 1,500 people, approximately. >> i want to ask a question. there's a distinction here that's important from the perspective of what kind of threat this constitutes to walmart. people joining the protests who are from the community or sympathetic or even consumers and folks who actually like yourself are walmart associates who are putting their necks on the line and risking possible retaliation, although walmart claims they'll never retaliate, to take concerted labor action. how many people are in that latter category. my sense is that it is a relatively small number of people. >> well, we had -- we're still getting the numbers in as far as nationwide because we had so many of these a
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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